WHAT IVE BEEN DOING ON SUNDAYS II

I haven’t been watching football on Sundays this year.

Why?

Who knows?

I have been shooting aspiring models and friends though.

 

The Weak End of Summer…

There were no 100 degree days this summer.

I’m not saying global warming is wrong, but back in the 90’s I recall consecutive summers in Baltimore and Georgia where the thermometer read 100 degrees or above.

The current/past summer was muggy yes. Hot? Not really to me.

I switched companies that I shoot sports for. (If you want to know to whom I switched check my Facebook page or something) Shooting sports is fun but the money is drying up pretty quickly. Fewer and fewer parents are willing to buy prints of their kid once he or she (the parent) leaves an event, and those photo tents you see at tournaments aren’t as lucrative as they once may have been. Couple that with newspapers and magazines dying slowly, and there really isn’t a major demand for sports photos. I see parents and high school students with semi-pro gear on the sidelines now all the time. They may not have the passion and skill to produce high level sports compositions, but that camera and lens they now hold represents the money they would have spent on professional photos perhaps…..

Sports are in full swing though. I’m booked to shoot every weekday afternoon (after my main job) up till probably the first week of November. I’m also shooting models now until kingdom come, and will probably miss many Sundays in front of the tube watching the Redzone channel because of it. Sundays are great to shoot models for that reason however. It’s a dead day in the city for foot traffic and that’s a perfect environment to shoot in….

MICROSTRUGGLER is nearly a year old. I mainly like to shoot women and that’s what this blog will be about moving forward: photos and women…..

Exit.

Model on Instagram is @myrlanis_

She only accepts followers who follow me first….

My IG is @rickyray73

Tee shirt available here.

3 Reasons to try Street Photography

Street photography probably isn’t for everyone. It is risky to some degree both physically and emotionally, and there isn’t a whole lot of money in it, to be honest. Most of the guys like Eric Kim who are making paper from street photography are doing it hosting workshops and touring, not from selling prints at gallery shows or to fashion magazines.

With that being said, here are 3 reasons to try street photography if you haven’t already…

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Washington DC

Street Photography is for introverts

To be hyper-transparent for a moment, I strongly prefer working with large corporate or mid to small business clients. There are a billion reasons why this is so and I may address them as this blog evolves, but that’s my personal preference as far as booking gigs goes. Of course I would book gigs with any client if the paper is right, but I particularly don’t like working with clients one-on-one where I’m expected to perform miracles. For example, amateur models sometimes have unrealistic expectations about how a shoot will turn out. As my friend and mentor puts it: You get skinny potential-runway models who want to look like print models and 5 foot 2 curvy models who want to be on the runway during fashion week.

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If I could feature these types of shots I’d shoot 6 weddings a month…

Besides portraiture, weddings are emotionally draining work and most of the wedding photographers I see when I shoot street photography on Saturdays look a mixture of terrified and depressed. They look like chicken zombies, seriously. In street photography there are no clients to worry about. Unless you’re on a photo walk there are no other shooters to compare yourself to or distract you. There is only you and the world, and it’s you versus the world….

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Rain is probably my favorite street condition besides maybe HEAVY snow…
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I love it when the bored bridesmaids spot me.

Street photography is for extroverts

Even if you are a go-getter, extrovert, life of the party type who books 50 weddings a year and has the maximum number of Facebook friends, street photography is still viable for you. Many extroverts spread themselves too thin and need solo time to redirect and work on the subtle nuances of their craft. Street photography gives a person that opportunity as well as giving a popular shooter some “artsy” shots to add to his or her portfolio. I am not by any reasoning a go-getter type. I am more brooding and badass, so I really don’t like seeing these jazzy attention grabbing types shooting art on my streets. But, if you must be a complete douchebag and bring your Nikon D5 with a 70-200 2.8 VR to shoot the streets then I can’t stop you. Street photography doesn’t always have to be counter-culture and dark. There is room for winners as well as losers. _47A1580-Edit-2.jpg

Street Photography doesn’t have many rules

You don’t need to master flash or filters or use a tripod or carry all sorts of backup gear when you shoot in the streets. Actually, if there is one rule Eric Kim frequently harps on that is brilliant it’s his one camera and one lens rule. That’s the only rule I can think of that matters. No need to switch bodies every few shots like you’re shooting college field hockey, or worry about comparative corner sharpness between the 6 lenses you brought with you. Street photography is very forgiving as to what is accepted as a decent street photograph, and after a few outings and postings on Facebook you’ll have all your friends and family calling you some sort of artist, when all you really did was apply a grainy preset in Lightroom.

Well that’s it. That’s the list. Put down your phone and go shoot 10 street photos with your big ass D5 or 1DX II before nightfall. If it’s night when you read this then do it the next day. When you’re out there do not hesitate or falter. Stay low and keep shooting!

Please like, follow and share…..(I know I ask a lot of you folks)